Category Archives: PEST CONTROL

Metallopeptide catalyst eases synthesis of antibody-drug conjugates

A promising drug-targeting approach is made easier thanks to a new rhodium-based catalyst

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Industry is too focused on applied research, chemists say in survey

Chemical enterprise must also address image problem to attract top talent

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Kuraray snags Calgon Carbon for $1.1 billion

Japanese acquirer says the activated carbon maker will make it a global force in filtration media

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Synthetic receptors imitate GPCRs

Vesicle signaling system could deliver drugs on command

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Triple Boston biotech launch includes Kaleido, LifeMine, and Disarm Therapeutics

Start-ups aim to modulate the microbiome, trawl fungal genomes for drugs, and prevent axon degeneration

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Molecular machine builds set of chiral molecules

Machine ‘arm’ swivels back and forth to add pieces stereoselectively

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3-D printers make aluminum pieces without cracks

Nanoparticles help print metal alloys more effectively

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Copper nanoparticles could help recycle CO<sub>2</sub> into fuel

New catalyst converts carbon dioxide to two- and three-carbon compounds

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Male Fruit Flies Don’t Handle Female Rejection Well | Tucson Fruit Fly Control

Male Fruit Flies Don’t Handle Female Rejection Well | Tucson Fruit Fly Control

During the early years following puberty, many young men will approach females with enthusiasm. However, these young post-pubescent adolescent males are sometimes shocked to find that the mating game is not as easy to play as they would like. Sometimes, human males can be flat-out rejected by interested females for a very long time. In some cases, human males may respond to a lack of female attention by avoiding contact with females altogether. Luckily, this does not seem common. After all, everybody can find love in this world, right? Well, some men can certainly respond negatively to rejection, as nobody likes the feeling of being rejected by a member of the opposite sex. However, the memories of being rejected may linger. The memories of being rejected by the opposite sex can be emotionally damaging to the point where some men may become discouraged from making further advancements later on. Although this behavior may seem complicated enough for Freudian analysis, it turns out that even insects can learn to give up on approaching females if they are rejected enough times.

Just like humans, insects have memories. The memories we have help us to determine what we are, and are not, capable of doing. Our memories tell us who we are, and insects are no different. A recent study observed the behavior adopted by male fruit flies that had been turned down repeatedly by female fruit flies that were uninterested in mating. According to Scientists at the University of California at Riverside, male fruit flies that fall victim to female rejection numerous times will eventually lose their enthusiasm for securing mating opportunities. Male fruit flies seem to be aware that approaching females is necessary in order to find willing sexual partners. Fruit flies also want to experience rewarding and pleasurable sexual encounters, but their memories will determine whether or not they actually will successfully mate.

The recent study showed that an insect’s hormone levels determine their ability to form memories. All insects possess a type of hormone that is referred to as a Juvenile hormone. (JH). This hormone is associated with dopamine production, and when levels are high, memories are formed. Male fruit flies that were given drugs to mimic high levels of JH eventually learned that approaching females was a waste of time after experiencing repeated rejections. Levels of JH and other hormones that regulate memory formation fluctuate at specific stages during an insect’s life. This research raises the question of how human hormones influence sexual behavior and cognitive functioning.

Do you think that this insect behavior mirrors human behavior? Do you think that our hormones and neurotransmitters communicate in order to facilitate sexual behavior?

 

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The Ig Nobel Prize Has Been Awarded To Researchers Who Discovered Insects With Reversed Genitalia

You have likely heard of the Nobel Prize, but the Ig Nobel Prize may be unfamiliar to you. As you can already figure out, the word “ignoble” is spelled out by adding an “Ig” to the front of the name “Nobel.” Obviously, these awards are granted just for fun, and the ceremonies are full of super-smart scientists getting silly. Despite the meaning of the word “ignoble,” these prizes are still an honor to receive, as only a hardworking scientist, or group of scientists, could ever win one of these awards. The awards are given to scientists who have discovered something trivial or have decided to focus their studies on a humorous subject. The awards are granted every year toward the beginning of fall. This year, a group of researchers won the Ig Nobel Prize for discovering a type of insect with an unusual sexual anatomy. Male insects that belong to the genus referred to as Neotrogla posses inner and outer female reproductive organs known as gynosomes; of course, the females of this genus possess a phallic-like male genitalia.

This is not an everyday sight, even for entomologists. Naturally, learning more about how such bizarre insects copulate is a necessity. Copulation between these insects can last for forty to seventy hours–as you can imagine, there would be plenty of moments of confusion during that time. During copulation, the males produce the ejaculate necessary for fertilization through their female reproductive organ, the gynosome. The male-gynosome, if you will, was composed of muscles, membranes, ducts and spikes. The researchers believe that this reversal in anatomy occurred as a result of “reversed sexual selection” where females competed for “seminal gifts.”

This year Harvard hosted the ceremony where ten prizes are given for strange scientific discoveries. The topic of the ceremony was “uncertainty.” The researchers responsible for the sexually peculiar insect discovery won the biology prize, which is only one of ten prizes given during the ceremony.

Would you be interested in learning about more insect-related research that had been awarded an Ig Nobel Prize? Have you ever heard of any other arthropod related research that had been granted either a Nobel Prize, or an Ig Nobel Prize? If you have, then which insect/s were involved?

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